Spanish beach bans leaping into the sea after tourists keep getting it wrong

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Spanish beach bans leaping into the sea after tourists keep getting it wrong
Spanish beach bans leaping into the sea after tourists keep getting it wrong

Brits visiting one of Spain's most popular resorts are being warned they risk a fine of 900 euros (£776) if caught jumping off the jetty into the sea.

Muro in Mallorca is famous for its beach, water-sports and the glistening sea that tempts warm holidaymakers in for a dip. Now it is trying to stop tourists from launching into the water after a number of wince-inducing accidents off Playa de Muro.

The town hall and police are warning holidaymakers not to fall to temptation and jump off one specific pontoon as they risk not only their health but the hefty fine too if they do so.

One British woman claimed she was not aware of the rule or the dangers after doing the jump with her daughter, saying she did not know how shallow the water there is or how many people have been hurt doing the same.

Spanish beach bans leaping into the sea after tourists keep getting it wrong eideziqkeiqhhinvTourists flock to the pier in order to leap off (Getty Images/Westend61)

In July, two people were injured after they jumped headfirst into the sea. The first, a 47-year-old Spanish man, broke his nose and injured his neck as he didn't realise the water was only 60 centimetres deep.

Spanish island loved by Brits wants to cut tourist numbers to stop 'saturation'Spanish island loved by Brits wants to cut tourist numbers to stop 'saturation'

The second man, a German aged 38, dived into the sea where it was just 6ft deep and suffered a head injury. In one of the accidents, the victim was knocked unconscious and had to be rescued from the water.

The resort has a municipal order prohibiting these types of jumps, but tourists are either unaware of it or un-phased by the potential penalties. Officials say there have been seven incidents so far this summer and they fear a tragedy is going to happen.

Many of the tourists jumping off the pontoons do so with their children, queuing up to leap off the end of the walkway. Locals say the jump has become "almost obligatory" for tourists, who take pictures of the jump and then post them on social media.

The council has ruled out putting up railings as they say tourists will just stand on top of them, increasing the height of the jump and therefore the danger. There are at least five large warning signs and more are to be put up.

“We ask people who come to be responsible. We cannot be constantly watching. By one leap you are changing your life. If you do well, well okay, you have fun. But if it goes wrong… it changes your life,” a police spokesperson said.

Officials in popular Spanish resorts have form when it comes to trying to control bad behaviour from tourists. It was announced earlier this summer that Brits face fines if they're caught hogging the best bits of some Spanish beaches this summer.

The local council in Benidorm has said it is totally fed up with sunbathers flocking to the beach as early as 7am to grab the best spot right by the sea, placing their towels down once they've found it. The holidaymakers are accused of then departing for a spot of breakfast or a nap before returning hours later, frustrating scores of other beachgoers unable to find a decent spot in the meantime.

Benidorm council says this has become a daily problem, with people placing towels, blankets, umbrellas and sunbeds to "reserve" their slots. For many, it has even become a "ritual". Some even use baby pushchairs or shopping trolleys to mark out their territory on the often overcrowded beaches.

Now, the local authority is calling time on the practice, warning beachgoers that the first six metres between the water and the sand should not be occupied at any time, with a £130 fine for those caught using parasols or towels to reserve a space.

Rita Sobot

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