Airport security worker warns passengers not to use locks on suitcases

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Airport security worker warns passengers not to use locks on suitcases
Airport security worker warns passengers not to use locks on suitcases

An airport security guard has warned air passengers that combination padlocks on suitcases are a waste of time.

The Transport Security Administration worker has taken to TikTok to give his view on the common means of securing luggage.

Many people opt for a combination lock, as they are already built in and don't require a key.

The means of locking can give travellers a sense of security and the feeling that their bag won't be tampered with while separated from them during a flight.

The security worker has shown that such a sense is false.

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With just a pen he was able to break through the zip of a suitcase, showing that the locks don't really add that much protection at all.

He said: "If you're ever traveling, make sure you are aware of how security systems in your bag can be breached.

"A lot of people I see travel with locks on their suitcases with special combinations, but with just a pen, you are actually able to breach a suitcase's security.

"The pen to the zipper technique has been around for tons of years, so I wanted show you guys this, so you know to look out for it.

"I'm just going to go all the way around and this once zipped up bag was opened with just a pen."

The security guard went on to give his suggestion for a more secure kind of bag.

He said: "The best kinds of zippers have covers over them. That's an extra added layer of security for your luggage when you're traveling."

The video has proved a huge hit online and inspired other travel enthusiasts to offer their own bag-related advice.

One person said: "Always clingwrap your bags. Most airports have this as a service, but you can do it at home!"

Another added: "Just don't store anything valuable in luggage."

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In recent months passengers concerned about their bags following issues with luggage returns have been using tracking devices to keep an eye on the location of their items.

Airport security worker warns passengers not to use locks on suitcasesPeople have began to turn to Airtags to keep track of their bags (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Attention was subsequently drawn to Apple Air Tags and other tracking devices, and whether they're actually allowed in plane holds.

The debate was sparked by Lufthansa saying they were banned, before retracting the statement.

Later Air New Zealand updated its terms of service with specific advice on luggage trackers in passengers' checked luggage.

They are only allowed in if they can be physically "turned off", rather than just being in sleep mode.

Some of the most popular baggage trackers, including the Apple AirTag and Tile, do not allow users to switch them off, and those that do are largely redundant as their tracking function isn't enabled.

Airlines including easyJet, TUI, Ryanair and more have differing policies about smart luggage that Brits are being urged to check before they fly.

Under UK regulations, bags with location devices inside are only allowed in the hold if steps have been taken to make sure they don't turn on accidentally and that they are protected enough so they won't be accidentally damaged.

The devices must also be switched off completely, and "not in sleep or hibernation mode".

That final rule means that AirTags and other locating devices are effectively banned from being checked-in on all commercial flights in the UK, as they don't work without being turned on.

Milo Boyd

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