Huge Viking hall discovered in 'biggest find' in more than a decade

1062     0
A large Viking hall has been uncovered by archaeologists in Denmark (Image: Nordjyske Museer)
A large Viking hall has been uncovered by archaeologists in Denmark (Image: Nordjyske Museer)

A massive Viking hall has been uncovered by archaeologists in what has been hailed as a historic discovery.

The remains of the large homestead are thought to be as much as a thousand years old - and experts think there is more of the structure left underground.

Researchers from the Historical Museum of Northern Jutland now believe the site in the town of Hune in Denmark was once home to a large hall where important meetings of guilds and senior Vikings would once have taken place.

A press release from the museum revealed the hall would have been around 130 feet long and 33 feet in width, with its huge roof supported by 10 to 12 cut oak posts.

Huge Viking hall discovered in 'biggest find' in more than a decade eidehiqdqikinvExperts believe there may be more of the structure left underground (Nordjyske Museer)

It it the largest Viking structure to be found in a decade and is distinct from other excavations made in the area.

Archaeologists make incredible discovery of 5,000-year-old pub with food insideArchaeologists make incredible discovery of 5,000-year-old pub with food inside

Archaeologist and excavation leader Thomas Rune Knudsen said in a press release: “This is the largest Viking Age find of this nature in more than ten years, and we have not seen anything like it before here in North Jutland, even though it has only been partially excavated.

“We only had the opportunity to excavate part of the hall, but there are probably several houses hidden under the mulch to the east. A hall building of this nature rarely stands alone”

Huge Viking hall discovered in 'biggest find' in more than a decadeResearchers believe the structure may have been built during the reign of famous Viking king Harald “Bluetooth” Blåtand (alamy)

Archaeologists have observed some similarities between the structure and castles built during reign of legendary Danish king Harald “Bluetooth” Blåtand.

The Viking king ruled the country from 958 AD to 986 and is remembered for converting the country to Christianity - as well as for the modern-day technology named after him.

They believe however that the hall is likely to have been on farmland belonging a nobleman, potentially Runulv den Rådsnilde, whose name is engraved on a runestone found nearby.

“It is difficult to prove that the found Viking hall belonged to the family of Runulv den Rådsnilde, but it is certainly a possibility,” Knudsen said.

Benedict Tetzlaff-Deas

Print page

Comments:

comments powered by Disqus